Southwestern Law School Los Angeles, CA
 

News Release

Southwestern Symposium Discusses How Homegrown Legislation Affects the Global Community November 02, 2010
Southwestern Symposium Discusses How Homegrown Legislation Affects the Global Community

Do U.S. laws stop at the border? If not, when do they - or when should they - govern the conduct of people abroad? A flurry of recent activity and scholarship has involved disputes over the geographic reach of domestic law. On Friday, November 12, renowned legal scholars and political scientists will convene to discuss this timely topic when Southwestern presents Beyond Borders - Extraterritoriality in American Law, a law review symposium to discuss the history, doctrine, and current issues related to this widely-discussed matter from a variety of viewpoints.

"As the world gets flatter and transboundary disputes become more common, countries are tempted to use extraterritorial laws - laws that regulate the activities of foreigners outside the country's borders - to solve global challenges," said Professor Austen Parrish, Vice Dean for Academic Affairs at Southwestern. "In the United States, domestic laws now often regulate extraterritorial activity. A burgeoning debate also exists over the extent to which U.S. Constitutional protections should apply outside U.S. territory. Against this backdrop, the symposium seeks to explore the history, doctrine, and current issues of when American laws should apply outside U.S. borders."

A number of scholars have recently written influential law review articles and books on this topic, and the U.S. Supreme Court decided a landmark case last term, Morrison v. National Australia Bank. For the near future, the topic of territoriality and extraterritoriality promises to be a focal point of discussion and debate for constitutional, transnational, and international law scholars.

The participants in the Symposium are remarkably accomplished and include the nation's leading scholars in this area of law.  They have written leading law review articles and influential books on issue of extraterritoriality, and the nation's highest courts consult their work when grappling with these difficult jurisdictional issues. Scheduled speakers for the symposium include:

  • Jeffery Atik, Professor of Law and Sayre Macneil Fellow, Loyola Law School
  • Lea Brilmayer, Howard M. Holtzmann Professor of International Law, Yale Law School
  • Hannah Buxbaum, Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Law, Indiana University, Maurer School of Law
  • Anthony J. Colangelo, Assistant Professor of Law, SMU Dedman School of Law
  • William S. Dodge, Professor of Law, University of California, Hastings College of the Law
  • Stephen Gardbaum, MacArthur Foundation Professor of International Justice and Human Rights, UCLA School of Law
  • Andrew T. Guzman, Associate Dean for International and Executive Education, Director of Graduate Programs and Professor of Law, University of California, Berkeley School of Law
  • Max Huffman, Associate Professor of Law and Dean's Fellow, Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis
  • Chimène Keitner, Associate Professor of Law, University of California, Hastings College of the Law
  • John H. Knox, Professor of Law, Wake Forest University School of Law
  • Daniel S. Margolies, Professor of History, Virginia Wesleyan College
  • Caleb Mason, Associate Professor of Law, Southwestern Law School
  • Jeffrey A. Meyer, Professor of Law, Quinnipiac University School of Law
  • Trevor W. Morrison, Professor of Law, Columbia Law School
  • Austen Parrish, Vice Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Law, Southwestern Law School
  • Tonya L. Putnam, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Columbia University
  • Kal Raustiala, Director, UCLA Ronald W. Burkle Center for International Relations and Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law and UCLA International Institute
  • Bartholomew H. Sparrow, Professor of Government, University of Texas at Austin
  • Peter J. Spiro, Charles R. Weiner Professor of Law, Temple University, Beasley School of Law
  • Christopher A. Whytock, Acting Professor of Law, University of California, Irvine School of Law


Registration begins at 8 a.m. and the symposium starts at 9 a.m. on Southwestern's campus. The cost for registration is $75 for Non-Southwestern Alumni seeking CLE credit and $50 for Southwestern Alumni seeking 5.5 hours of CLE credit. Those not seeking CLE credit will be charged $40 (which includes lunch). Visitor parking costs $6. For a map and directions, click here. Event registration information can be found online. Additional questions may be directed to the Law Review Office or the Student Affairs Office.