Southwestern Law School Los Angeles, CA
 

Faculty Profile

Christine Metteer Lorillard

Christine Metteer Lorillard

Professor of Legal Analysis, Writing and Skills Emeritus

B.A., cum laude, English, 1973, M.A., English, 1975, and Ph.D., English, 1978, University of California, Los Angeles

Publications

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A former lecturer at the University of California, Los Angeles, Christine Metteer Lorillard also served as an editorial consultant for BFA Educational Media before joining Southwestern's faculty in 1979. Over the ensuing three decades, she has been instrumental in the development of and new faculty training for the law school's comprehensive legal writing program. She also served for many years as faculty advisor to the PLEAS Program, Southwestern's unique part-time day division for students with child care responsibilities. She became Professor Emeritus in 2013.

"All legal writing is undertaken to make something happen, to influence future events. Good legal writing accomplishes that, whether in an objective memorandum, influencing a firm's decision about whether to take a case to trial; in a trial brief, influencing the way existing law should be applied to a particular case; or in an appellate brief, influencing the law a state will create or adopt."

Professor Lorillard is particularly active in the greater legal writing community and has conducted special seminars or chaired panel presentations for the California Young Lawyers Association, the Los Angeles Women Lawyer's Association, the Modern Language Association, the Conference on Legal Writing, the Conference on College Communication and Composition, and other professional writing forums. She has served on the board of directors of the Legal Writing Institute and the board of editors for the Institute's journal.

Professor Lorillard approaches legal writing from the point of view of the function and intended audience of the document, and believes that "all legal writing is undertaken to make something happen, to influence future events. Good legal writing accomplishes that, whether in an objective memorandum, influencing a firm's decision about whether to take a case to trial; in a trial brief, influencing the way existing law should be applied to a particular case; or in an appellate brief, influencing the law a state will create or adopt." She points out, "In the process of developing strong legal writing skills, students learn how to express themselves effectively and efficiently."

For over a decade Professor Lorillard has pursued a strong interest in both Native American and Children's Rights. Her research has resulted in scholarly articles on the Indian Child Welfare Act, adoption law, and on factors determining "Indian" status for federal rights and benefits. Her current scholarship is focused on International Children's Rights and Fourth Amendment Rights of Children in the Public School System.

Publications

Books and Chapters

CHILDREN AND THE LAW: THE COMPETING RIGHTS, PRIVILEGES, AND INTERESTS OF CHILDREN, PARENTS, AND THE STATE, (with J. Bohl; Vandeplas Publishing, 2010)

Pigs in Heaven: A Parable of Native American Adoption under the Indian Child Welfare Act in FAMILIES BY LAW: AN ADOPTION READER (New York University Press, 2004)

Pigs in Heaven: A Parable of Native Adoption under the Indian Child Welfare Act in MIXED RACE AMERICA AND THE LAW (Kevin R. Johnson, ed., New York University Press, 2002)

Articles

When Children's Rights 'Collide': Free Speech vs. the Right to be Let Alone in the Context of Off-Campus 'Cyber-Bullying,' 81 MISSISSIPPI LAW JOURNAL (Fall 2011)

Informed Choices and Uniform Decisions: Adopting the ABA's Self-Enforcing Administrative Model to Ensure Successful Surrogacy Arrangements, 16 CARDOZO JOURNAL OF LAW AND GENDER 237 (2010)

Southwestern's PLEAS Program, A New Place for Flexible Programs, 38 SOUTHWESTERN LAW REVIEW 645 (2009)

Retelling the Stories of Indian Families: Judicial Narratives that Determine the Placement of Indian Children, 8 WHITTIER JOURNAL OF CHILD & FAMILY ADVOCACY 171 (2009)

Placing Second Parent Adoption Along the 'Rational Continuum' of Constitutionally Protected Family Rights, 30 RUTGERS WOMEN'S RIGHTS LAW REPORTER (Fall 2008)

Stories That Make The Law Free: Literature As A Bridge Between The Law And The Culture In Which It Must Exist, 12 TEXAS WESLEYAN LAW REVIEW 251 (Fall 2005 - Symposium Issue - The Power of Stories: Intersections of Law, Literature and Culture)

The Trust Doctrine, Sovereignty and Membership: Determining who is Indian, 5 RUTGERS RACE AND THE LAW REVIEW 53 (2003)

Some 'Incest' is Harmless Incest: Determining the Fundamental Right to Marry of Adults Related by Affinity without Resorting to State Incest Statutes, 10 KANSAS JOURNAL OF LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY 262 (Winter 2000)

A Law Unto Itself: The Indian Child Welfare Act as Inapplicable and Inappropriate to the Transracial/Race Matching Adoption Controversy, 38 BRANDEIS LAW JOURNAL 47 (Fall 1999/2000)

Hard Cases Making Bad Law: The Need for Revision of the Indian Child Welfare Act, 38 SANTA CLARA LAW REVIEW 419 (1998)

The Existing Indian Family Exemption: An Impediment to the Trust Responsibility to Preserve Tribal Culture and Existence as Manifest in the Indian Child Welfare Act, 30 LOYOLA OF LOS ANGELES LAW REVIEW 647 (January 1997)

Pigs in Heaven: A Parable of Native American Adoption Under the Indian Child Welfare Act, 28 ARIZONA STATE LAW JOURNAL 589 (1996)

Introduction to Legal Writing: A Course for Pre-Law Students, 3 PERSPECTIVES: TEACHING LEGAL WRITING AND RESEARCHING, No. 2 (Winter 1995)

Accommodating the Needs of a Changing Society: Part-time Legal Education for Parents, JOURNAL OF LEGAL EDUCATION (December 1993)

Achieving Plain English: An Exercise in Legal Style, THE SECOND DRAFT (October 1991)

Teaching Students to Write Persuasively, THE SECOND DRAFT 14 (August 1985)